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Thursday, March 31, 2011

Deep Leadership: Interior Dimensions Of Large Scale Change

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Session Description

Those working to change the world face obstacles rarely addressed in traditional leadership doctrines. Vision, risk and uncertainty take on new meaning in realms where lives are impacted by poverty, pandemics, conflict and injustice. Join Archbishop Desmond Tutuand other social sector leaders in this intimate discussion focused on the interior landscape of leadership – a dimension where character rules, love and belief trump strategy, and resilience, renewal and patience are lifeblood for the long haul.

When | Where

09:00 - 10:30 Thursday, March 31

Session leaders

  • Member, Elders, The
    Archbishop Desmond Tutu is a South African Anglican cleric who became one of the central leaders of the global peace movement. An outspoken defender of human rights and campaigner for the oppressed, Tutu's eloquent advocacy and brave leadership lead to the end of South African apartheid in 1993 and the installation of Nelson Mandela as the nation's first black President. The Archbishop has dedicated his life to reshaping conversations about peace, equality and forgiveness. In his role as global peace maker, Tutu earned the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts and now devotes his time with the Desmond and Leah Tutu Legacy Foundation and the Desmond Tutu Peace Foundation USA teaching youth the powerful role and voice they play in creating a more compassionate and peaceful world. The Archbishop released a new book, The Book of Forgiving, in March 2014, with daughter Mpho Tutu.
  • Joe Madiath Speaker
    Founder-cum-Chairman, Gram Vikas
    Joe Madiath completed his studies in English literature from Madras University. He was elected as the President of Madras University Students’ Union and founded the Young Students’ Movement for Development (YSMD) to harness positively the student disenchantment prevailing during the period. In 1969, he journeyed across India, Nepal, Bhutan and Sri Lanka on a bicycle for a year. In 1971, Joe led 400 YSMD volunteers to manage a number of relief camps for refugees from Bangladesh. Later that year, 40 volunteers along with Joe, moved to Orissa, which had been ravaged by a cyclone and tidal waves. Joe and a few colleagues decided to stay on in the area after relief work to work as development activists. They moved to Ganjam District in southern Orissa in 1976 on invitation from Government, to initiate development activities among the indigenous communities. This resulted in the establishment of Gram Vikas in 1979. Since its inception, till the end of June 2014 Joe has been the Executive Director of Gram Vikas and now the Chairman of Gram Vikas. Gram Vikas, today, is one of the largest NGOs in Orissa, reaching out to over 100,000 indigenous and poor families living in 1200 rural habitations with a population over 400,000. Some of the pioneering efforts of Gram Vikas have been in biogas promotion, community forestry, rural habitat development and education. Gram Vikas’ current approach to convergent community action with water and sanitation as the entry point is evolving into a movement influencing local democratic self-governance and poor people’s control over development processes. Recipient of awards: Allan Shawn Feinstein World Hunger Award; Global Development Network Award (1998); World Habitat Award (2002); Kyoto World Water Grand Prize (2006); Social Life Time Achievement Award by Godfrey Phillips Red and White Bravery Awards (2006); NGO of the Year (2006) by Resource Alliance; Skoll Award for Social Entrepreneurs (2006) by Skoll Foundation, USA
  • President and Executive Director, Visayan Forum Foundation
    Ma. Cecilia Flores-Oebanda (Cecilia) spent most of her life as a Freedom Fighter. She fought against the Marcos regime as a freedom fighter. She was captured when she was pregnant with her second child and for four years, raised two of her kids in jail. Upon her release after the People Power revolution, she established the Visayan Forum Foundation, Inc. (VF), a non-proft recognized worldwide for its innovative solutions to end modern slavery. She is an Anti-Slavery Awardee, a Trafficking in Persons Hero, and the Skoll Award for Social Entrepreneurship Awardee. She was featured by The CNN Freedom Project in a full-length documentary entitled “The Fighters". She is also featured in BBC, PBS-US and CCTV. The safehouse VF operates now houses trafficking victims who are on the way to healing, economic empowerment, prosecution of their abusers and re-integration to mainstream society.
  • Board Chair, Girls Not Brides
    A global advocate for freedom, justice and development for over two decades, Mabel van Oranje is the initiator and chair of ‘Girls Not Brides: The Global Partnership to End Child Marriage’. She is also co-founder and the executive chair of the European Council on Foreign Relations. She is a member of the (advisory) boards of the Coalition for the International Criminal Court, Crisis Action, Global Witness, the Malala Fund, the Open Society Foundations and The Elders. In 1993, Mabel founded the European Action Council for Peace in the Balkans and was its CEO until 1997. In 1997, she joined the Open Society Foundations in Brussels as Executive Director, becoming OSF’s London-based International Advocacy Director in 2003. From 2008 until 2012, she was the first CEO of The Elders. Mabel helped found the Dutch foundation War Child (1995), the global NGO coalition ‘Publish What You Pay’ (2002) and the Independent Commission on Turkey (2004). She has been actively engaged in the fight against HIV/AIDS and in global efforts that led to the establishment of the International Criminal Court in 2002. Mabel holds masters degrees in Economics and Political Science (cum laude) from the University of Amsterdam. In 2005, the World Economic Forum named her one of its Young Global Leaders. In 2014, she received a Skoll Award for Social Entrepreneurship and the John Diefenbaker Defender of Human Rights and Freedom Award for her work with Girls Not Brides. You can follow her tweets @MabelvanOranje
  • Paul Farmer Speaker
    Co-founder and Chief Strategist, Partners In Health
    Medical anthropologist and physician Paul Farmer has dedicated his life to improving health care for the world's poorest people. He is Co-founder and Chief Strategist of Partners In Health (PIH), an international non-profit organization that since 1987 has provided direct health care services and undertaken research and advocacy activities on behalf of those who are sick and living in poverty. Dr. Farmer and his colleagues in the U.S. and abroad have pioneered novel community-based treatment strategies that demonstrate the delivery of high-quality health care in resource-poor settings. Dr. Farmer holds an M.D. and Ph.D. from Harvard University, where he is the Kolokotrones University Professor and the Chair of the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School; he is also Chief of the Division of Global Health Equity at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston. Additionally, Dr. Farmer serves as the United Nations Special Adviser to the Secretary-General on Community Based Medicine and Lessons from Haiti. Dr. Farmer has written extensively on health, human rights, and the consequences of social inequality. He is the recipient of numerous honors, including the Margaret Mead Award from the American Anthropological Association, the Outstanding International Physician (Nathan Davis) Award from the American Medical Association, a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, and, with his PIH colleagues, the Hilton Humanitarian Prize. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.