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Wednesday, March 28, 2007

Do Governments Now Run The Social Enterprise Agenda?

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Session Description

Governments increasingly encourage the social enterprise movement, lauding its potential for efficiency and innovation. Government purchasing is being directed at the movement to encourage it to ‘step up to the mark’ but these efforts are accompanied by more stringent contracting obligations undermining the reasons for their success.

The session will provide an opportunity for policy makers and social entrepreneurs to open up the debate about state/social enterprise relations.

When | Where

12:00 - 14:00 Wednesday, March 28

Session leaders

  • Indianna Minto Speaker
    Dr. Indianna D. Minto-Coy joins the SRC as a Research Fellow, having previously held the position of Research Consultant. She has had appointments at the Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship, Said Business School at the University of Oxford and most recently as Assistant Professor at the University of Waterloo and Research Fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation where she also coordinated the research component of the Caribbean Economic Governance Project. Indianna is also a Research Affiliate at the International Migration Resource Centre at Wilfrid Laurier University, Canada.
  • Tim Curtis Speaker
    Senior Research Fellow, Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship
    After ten years of working with governments, the private sector and communities on environmental issues and starting environmental and social businesses, Tim developed a specialism in social entrepreneurship through a major four year European Social Fund programme on social enterprise in the East Midlands and the south of England. During this time he was research manager at the Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship at the University of Oxford. His research involved public procurement and state aid challenges for entrepreneurship in the public sector. Since arriving at the University of Northampton, Tim has developed and validated both a BA and Masters programme in social enterprise development and management, and is currently redeveloping a programme in the School of Health on Community Organising and Development. He is actively engaged in developing social entrepreneurship initiatives across the University, in all the Schools, and has helped several new social enterprises start from community projects. He has advised GPs, local authorities and health sector agencies on the emerging opportunities and challenges of delivering the big society.